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Stuart Welch on the Tevere

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River Tevere - Tuscany, Italy

Stuart's Blog

So if you've kept up with this blog you will know that I try to fish more than the River Wharfe in Yorkshire. I've had my eye on the River Tevere in Italy for a while, and a family holiday to Tuscany last week gave me the opportunity to give it a go.

For those of you who haven't been to Tuscany in Italy, let me set the scene a little with some of the photo's I took.  See the countryside, in this photo I took early morning...

..and that really was representative of the local scenery.  I took this photo in the local town of Anghiari, and I think it does give you a flavour of this historic town....

I had arranged to meet a guide to show me around the river.  I had found Moreno Borriero both independently - via a web search - and also as a recommendation on one of the fly fishing forums on the web.  We agreed to meet at the club house at 8.30 to get all the required tickets/documents, and from there we set off for the river.  Pretty soon we arrived here......

...which was a really picturesque pool.  The water was quite clear and had an acquamarine look to it, which you could see much more obviously once we were in the river proper...

As you may know, I prefer dry fly fishing. Moreno had pointed out that the best time for fish rising was from tea time onwards, but nevertheless we stared off on the dry.  To be fair the sun was beating down and there wasn't much rising.  Here's Moreno tying on a tippet for me...

After no luck on the dry fly, and with little activity around, we switched to a nymph. What a difference. From one of the longer glides - where Mareno knew there were fish - I took quite a few.  They mostly came to a PTN with a flourescent orange bead head, a fly that I've had quite a bit of success with on the Wharfe. Here are a few of the fish....

I managed nine on the nymph before we saw a couple start to rise and I switched back to a dry.  Within a few casts I took a small brownie on a Blue Wing CDC Paradun, and was delighted to have finally caught one on the dry.  By this time it was lunch time so we repaired to a local hostelry to get out of the mid-day sun and enjoy a rather good Porcini Risotto!

When we returned, we moved along the river to a second pool....

It was now just after 2pm, and one or two fish were starting to rise regularly.  However, the interesting thing was that the water was so clear that you could see the fish coming up to the dry fly, inspecting it, then turning away.  I presume this is what it's like chalk stream fishing? So the frustration continued as time and again we watched the fish come up then turn away.  We tried a number of flies and eventually it was the good old F Fly (in size 20) that took the first two fish.   Then they even stopped taking those.  Moreno pulled out a rather small, tatty looking fly which he then proceded to strip back even further.  With this we fished on and I then took a couple more before this beauty....

By now it was almost time for me to get back to the villa.   It was frustrating as it was approaching tea time and the fish really were beginning to rise.  On the way back up the river Moreno took the rod and, within a couple of casts, had a fish of his own....

It was a great day's fishing, and my thanks to Moreno for providing such a memorable day.  But I wasn't quite finished yet.  A couple of days later I returned at tea time on my own - to this same second pool - and set about it by myself.  I also wanted to see if my favourite dry fly - the CDC & Elk - worked here too.  I started with the F Fly and soon had landed a medium sized grayling. This was followed by a reasonable brown trout.  I then switched to the CDC & Elk as the light began to fade and was rewared with another 3 good brownies, these being two....

The evening rise hadn't finished, but I'd had a great evening and the family were waiting for me so we could go out (again!) to dinner.  Reluctantly I packed up, knowing that would be it for my Italian adventure this year.

Would I go again? Already planning it! In terms of costs, I had to join the Mosca Club Altotevere (EUR33), get a local fishing licence (EUR10), and for each day on the Tevere I had to get a day permit (EUR10).  So the total cost was EUR63 for the two day fishing trip.  Moreno cost pretty much the same as a day's guiding in the UK, and was tremendous value for money.  I would heartily recommend!

Cheers

Last Updated on Friday, 12 August 2011 09:55